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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 282-286

Effect of integrated people-centred eye care (IPEC) model on eye care seeking behaviour of community


1 Assistant Professor, Department of Preventive Oncology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Professor, Department of Community Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Additional Professor, Department of Community Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
4 Additional Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
5 Research Officer, Department of Community Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Praveen Vashist
788, Department of Community Ophthalmology, Dr. R P Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijph.ijph_1391_21

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Background: World report on vision makes integrated people-centered eye care as care model of choice. Integrating eye care with the existing public health system makes services available, accessible, affordable, and sustainable. Being from the community, Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) are better suited to improve people's eye health-seeking behavior. Objectives: This study aims to assess the eye care-seeking behavior of community and to understand their response toward the approach of integrated vision centers (VC) with ASHA involvement. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in South Delhi district where integrated VC were functional for more than a year. These centers were supervised by medical officer in-charge, under whom ophthalmic assistants, ASHAs, auxiliary nurse midwives, and pharmacist work. ASHAs were trained in community-based primary eye care. The community survey was conducted on eye health-seeking behavior and utilization of VC services. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Out of 1571 study participants, 998 reported any ophthalmic illness in family in the past 6 months as against 1302 who reported nonophthalmic illness in family. The majority (1461, 90%) were aware about integrated VC and half of them (748, 51.2%) visited it. Of them, 64.2% were motivated through ASHAs. ASHAs spread awareness about eye diseases, eye treatment facility, and referred patients from the community. The majority (93%) were happy with the integrated VC and 87.8% were happy with ASHAs. Conclusion: Integrated VC with ASHA engagement could pave the way for universal eye health. Understanding people's needs and engaging community would increase the demand for eye care.


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